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Using Antibiotics Responsibly, Part 1: The Veterinarian’s Valuable Role

07 June 2017

Zoetis

For beef producers, the veterinarian plays a central role. When we do need to use antibiotics, we know that we need to use them responsibly (in both animals and people) to help keep them effective and available for decades to come.

 What are some of the steps to help make this happen? In caring for cattle, responsible use of antibiotics involves many things and people, but there’s one person who should continue to be part of these decisions — a veterinarian.

Veterinarians strive to prescribe antibiotics in a responsible way.

“As veterinarians, we have an ethical responsibility to make sure that we preserve the efficacy of antibiotics for future generations and ensure continued access to certain classes of antibiotics in food animals,” said Robin Falkner, DVM, managing veterinarian at Zoetis. “We use our medical training when we prescribe these medicines to restore or maintain animal health and well-being, and we take the responsibility of using them very seriously.”

Veterinarians strive to prescribe antibiotics in a responsible way to not only help treat infections but also to help reduce the unintended risk of antimicrobial resistance. This includes helping producers:

  • Decrease the need to use antibiotics. Doing things to help keep animals from ever getting sick is our top priority, Dr. Falkner said. This means looking at disease management and making tweaks that can help prevent disease outbreaks.
  • Ensure antibiotics are used only when they are needed. Antibiotics are only effective against bacterial infection. Veterinarians help identify if a bacterial disease is present or likely to be present, and then can recommend the right antibiotic to help address the disease challenge. For instance, there are four key bacterial pathogens associated with bovine respiratory disease, and we can recommend an antibiotic that will be effective against these pathogens, Dr. Falkner said.
  • Reduce the need for additional antibiotic treatments. Animals sometimes get sick, so when we do need to treat these animals, our priority becomes getting the highest treatment success, Dr. Falkner said. There are different classes of antibiotics that work in different ways. For example, a triamilide macrolide, such as DRAXXIN® (tulathromycin) Injectable Solution, works by interfering with protein synthesis in target pathogens, and a cephalosporin, such as EXCEDE® (ceftiofur crystalline free acid) Sterile Suspension, kills bacteria by destroying cell walls. If you have the right antibiotic that works the first time, you can use fewer antibiotics and have fewer animals exposed to multiple classes of antibiotics.
  • Avoid antibiotic residues in meat. Proper administration and following label instructions are important to ensure product efficacy and safety. This means reviewing treatment protocols with your veterinarian about the correct dose, route of administration and adhering to proper withdrawal times.

See the results of a good relationship.

“What I find is, when the veterinarian understands what’s important to the producer in the long-term, the veterinarian can make recommendations beyond just treating the immediate animal that’s sick,” Dr. Falkner said. “It takes effort, and the intent of both parties, to develop that type of relationship and see the results that this relationship can bring.”

For Brenda Paul, owner at Timberlawn Farm in Paris, Kentucky, it means she can keep making improvements. Having a veterinarian’s input enhances animal health decisions that can help maintain the responsible use of antibiotics.

“An outside opinion is a very helpful thing to have,” Paul said. “We’re constantly evaluating what’s working, what’s not working and what changes we need to make.”

Her veterinarian helps in evaluating data to see if they’re heading in the right direction, if there’s a treatment need, or if they need a change in the protocol.

“We’ve been working together on developing this program over all the years we’ve been in the business,” Paul said. “And that will continue for many years.”

Next up: Did you know that the effectiveness of an antibiotic also plays a role in responsible use? Part 2 of this series will explore the relationship. In the meantime, keep working with a veterinarian on the responsible use of antibiotics and find more information at ZoetisUS.com/DRAXXIN-Beef.com.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR DRAXXIN: DRAXXIN has a pre-slaughter withdrawal time of 18 days in cattle. Do not use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older. Do not use in animals known to be hypersensitive to the product. See full Prescribing Information.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION FOR EXCEDE: People with known hypersensitivity to penicillin or cephalosporins should avoid exposure to EXCEDE. EXCEDE is contraindicated in animals with known allergy to ceftiofur or to the ß-lactam group (penicillins and cephalosporins) of antimicrobials. Inadvertent intra-arterial injection is possible and fatal. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. Pre-slaughter withdrawal time is 13 days following the last dose. See full Prescribing Information.

About Zoetis
Zoetis is the leading animal health company, dedicated to supporting its customers and their businesses. Building on more than 60 years of experience in animal health, Zoetis discovers, develops, manufactures and markets veterinary vaccines and medicines, complemented by diagnostic products, genetic tests, biodevices and a range of services. Zoetis serves veterinarians, livestock producers and people who raise and care for farm and companion animals with sales of its products in more than 100 countries. In 2016, the company generated annual revenue of $4.9 billion with approximately 9,000 employees. For more information, visit www.zoetisUS.com.

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