TheCattleSite.com - news, features, articles and disease information for the cattle industry


Go Back   TheCattleSite Discussion Forum > Beef Cattle Health/Welfare
User Name
Password
FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Unread April 20th, 2009, 17:55
KC78 KC78 is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1
Default stiff legged heifer

I had a little heifer calf born this past Thursday and she is approx. 5/8 Shorthorn. She appears healthy with one problem. She walks very stiff in her front end and very much up on her toes. I have examined her legs and all the boney structure seems correct. She toes out slightly on her right front. Her joints all seem to move easily when I manipulate them. Can anyone tell me what I might be dealing with here or give me more information on what I can do with her to help her walk easier. Thank you!
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Unread April 22nd, 2009, 13:01
happyheifer happyheifer is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 11
Default

some calves are born "knuckled over". Usually, its big bull calves that are affected that have been cramped up in utero, and yes, they will walk up on tip toes or roll over onto their "knucles". After a week or so, they usually correct themselves as the ligaments stretch out and the joints ease. Just make sure she gets up on her feet to feed. Dont take pity and feed her lying down as it will do her a disservice in the long run. She should be up and frollicking in a couple of weeks.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Unread May 19th, 2009, 12:45
happyheifer happyheifer is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 11
Default

I have mostl;y noticed it in cows that have quickly gained weight in the dry period say 3-4 weeks prior to calving, although some bulls do throw big calves. So both dietary and genetic. As far as percentages go, it depends on the bulls used and the management of your close up pregnant cows and heifers. You want to have them at the body condition to calve down in by 2 months prior to calving. This provides the cows with the energy required to produce milk after calving without too far exceeding their own energy demands and mostly ensures constant growth of th calf without too much of a spurt just prior to calving.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 00:40.


The Essential Guide to Meat - Old Pond Publishing

Our Sponsors

Partners


Seasonal Picks

So You Want to Be a Vet - 5m Books