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  #1  
Unread May 1st, 2010, 16:28
handsomenaqvi handsomenaqvi is offline
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Default blood from teat of pregnant cow

I am not sure if this is an emergency or not.... cow is due to calve any time and I have periodically gone over and checked her teats and bag. Tonight there was blood spray.Have I hurt her is this a sign of something else?the udder and teats becomes hard...and i have to milk them to release the blood...i wanna know that Has she kicked her bag and broken some blood vessel?or is this common during pregnancy?Should we be concerned?
i have tried many medicines...but the results are same please help me...i am worried about the cow.....doctors said that it is a bacterial disease but .......the blood still comes out while milking please halp me and tell me a good medicine to cure this disease
thanks in advance
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  #2  
Unread May 1st, 2010, 16:41
joncowcare joncowcare is offline
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Hi Handsomenqvi,
Welcome to the forum !
Now, you ain't going to like this but please, if your cow has not calved yet do not milk her or otherwise touch her udder !
It is quite usual for a cows udder to become engorged and turgid before calving [it's called "Oedema"] and this will correct itself within a few weeks.
Because of the great pressure in the udder at this time it's also quite usual for a few small blood vessels to rupture and turn the milk a pink colour.
It is important not to milk a cow before calving because the cows first milk contains antibodies [known as 'Colostrum'] which are vital to the calf and which will supply it with immunity to any local bacteria or other pathogens.
By milking your cow before she has calved you run the risk of denying your future calf this colostrum and it's importance to protect it from disease.
Good luck !
Jon
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  #3  
Unread May 1st, 2010, 16:52
handsomenaqvi handsomenaqvi is offline
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brother thanks for replying...i am really thankful to you for your concern...
but brother the problem is that the udder and teats gets swelled and the cow feels pain...then what to do.....
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  #4  
Unread May 2nd, 2010, 13:21
handsomenaqvi handsomenaqvi is offline
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hello thanks for reply rena
i would post the details of medicines etc asap
and please tell me one more thing ...that...is joncowcare brother a doctor?or any other doctor here?please do tell me
thanks
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  #5  
Unread May 3rd, 2010, 15:29
handsomenaqvi handsomenaqvi is offline
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the cow is having swelling just like this
please see this video...its not my cow...but my cows udder and teats are just like this cow
here is the link for the video
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gzcISH4h200
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  #6  
Unread May 3rd, 2010, 15:31
handsomenaqvi handsomenaqvi is offline
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we have given the following injections on doctors advice
1-GENTA-TYLOSIN
2-CIPROSEL
3-NORFLOXILLIN-100
4-GENTAFAR 10% gentamicin
5-LOXIN
please do tell me now what to do
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  #7  
Unread May 4th, 2010, 12:36
joncowcare joncowcare is offline
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Hi Handsomenaqvi,
I am not a doctor or vet I'm afraid although I do have many qualifications for dairying/farming I'm just a herdsman with many years experience of caring for cows.
I am puzzled by the sheer number of different injections/products used for your cow. They are antibiotics apart from the Loxin which is more of an anti-inflammatory but I do not comprehend why your doctor used so many especially as they are all extremely expensive and could possibly have been replaced with cheaper products.[what dosage of each ?]
Is it possible to show us a photo please so that we can help you more ?
Jon
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  #8  
Unread October 21st, 2010, 08:56
FINNEGAN.JAXON FINNEGAN.JAXON is offline
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She should not be getting milked until after the calf is born. Not only is it bad for her it is bad for the calf in a couple of ways. If she is being milked she may not produce colostrum for the calf. The developing calf is placing the greatest demand on her body for nutrients as it finishes developing. Milking uses nutrients available for the calf. She will not stop after the calf is born. She should not have been producing much if any milk until it is.
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  #9  
Unread October 21st, 2010, 20:11
hscsalers hscsalers is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by handsomenaqvi
I am not sure if this is an emergency or not.... cow is due to calve any time and I have periodically gone over and checked her teats and bag. Tonight there was blood spray.Have I hurt her is this a sign of something else?the udder and teats becomes hard...and i have to milk them to release the blood...i wanna know that Has she kicked her bag and broken some blood vessel?or is this common during pregnancy?Should we be concerned?
i have tried many medicines...but the results are same please help me...i am worried about the cow.....doctors said that it is a bacterial disease but .......the blood still comes out while milking please halp me and tell me a good medicine to cure this disease
thanks in advance


Sounds like mastitis to me. Or even teet tumors as those are the only times I have seen blood in the milk of cows. Now you have probably killed the calf because depending on how much you have milked her she may have no colostrum left for the calf if this is the case the calf is twice as likely to die and more than likely will if it gets no colostrum. Meddlers with mother nature do more harm than good. Take some meds called today (Yes that is the name of the med) and infuse directly into the teat.

Today

http://www.americanlivestock.com/p-1...tis-tubes.aspx

Last edited by hscsalers : October 21st, 2010 at 20:15.
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  #10  
Unread October 21st, 2010, 20:17
hscsalers hscsalers is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rena
Hi handsomenaqvi,
First I would like to say, don't 'milk' anymore out. Each time you do this you open a 'preset' plug that protects the inside of the udder from bacteria and can eventually cause your girl to get mastitis (as bacteria enters very easily once you open the teat. It can take up to 20 minutes for the sphincter to reclose once you open it).

As the udder fills and if there is edema, it is normal for capillaries to burst and cause a 'red' blood look to the milk. This will be remedied once your girl is lactating and her udder is getting 'into the swing' of things.

Please tell of the medicines that you have used, the treatments and durations that you have used them for as well as when you last used them. <include the names>

Just kinda watch from a distance for now, Ok? I'm sure she'll do just fine.

Rena


Ummmmmmmmm not to be rude or anything but this cow already probably has mastitis and in one of the posts he said his vet even said it was bacterial. Why the vet didnt advise of how to treat it was beyond me. Perhaps they were lazy who knows. Alot of vets dont like to get dirty they like to stay in their climate controlled office and work on small animals.
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